So ...

Mar. 19th, 2012 07:42 am
rydra_wong: Lisa Rands' chalky hands on the sloper on the route Gaia (climbing -- hands)
[personal profile] rydra_wong posting in [community profile] the_great_outdoors
If I was, in a super-hypothetical way, starting to consider acquiring a sleeping bag and tent for possible use in good weather in the British summer ...

What would I need to know?

Date: 2012-03-19 01:53 pm (UTC)
moem: A computer drawing that looks like me. (Default)
From: [personal profile] moem
You would need to know how you'd be travelling (which has impact on how heavy your tent can be, and how large it needs to be so you can fit your gear inside) and how much you'd be willing to spend.
You would also need to take into account how often you'd be moving your tent.

Sleeping bag: packed size matters most here, as does budget. Also, whether you tend to get sweaty or get cold.

Date: 2012-03-19 02:26 pm (UTC)
moem: Me, riding my bike through a river. (motor in wadi)
From: [personal profile] moem
The pop-up tents are usable for this sort of thing, but they stay pretty big when folded. I'd rather go for a simple dome tent in your case.

Since you're going to be carrying the tent, it had best be below 3,5 kilos and below 3 would be even better.

And since you are a sweaty sleeper, a lightweight down (not synthetic) sleeping bag would be the ultimate solution. They aren't cheap, though.

Date: 2012-03-19 02:36 pm (UTC)
moem: A computer drawing that looks like me. (Default)
From: [personal profile] moem
Examples of tents that I'd consider suitable:
Coleman Bedrock 2 or Coleman Cobra 2. Not expensive, and nice and light.

Date: 2012-03-19 02:44 pm (UTC)
moem: Me, riding my bike through a river. (motor in wadi)
From: [personal profile] moem
Ah, then they might very well be an option. Yes, they're light, they can be below 2 kilos. I have never used one, personally.

Date: 2012-03-19 11:14 pm (UTC)
spiralsheep: Sheep wearing an eyepatch (spiralsheep Ram Raider mpfc)
From: [personal profile] spiralsheep
I've only ever slept in other people's tents as I prefer lightweight wild camping even in sub-zero temperatures.

Think about whether you want to be easy to see or difficult to see and choose a colour for your outer layer accordingly.

Bivi Bag. I used to take a "survival" bag anyway so it made sense to upgrade to a good quality bivi bag (waterproof AND with a breathing panel when it's fully zipped up to cover the face) and use that as my outer layer cos my rucksack already had its own waterproof.

Sleeping Mat. For me the most important item was the thickest sleeping mat (mine was rollable foam) I was prepared to carry. If I was carrying a bouldering mat anyway then I'd've used that, heh.

Sleeping Bag. I tend to be a hot/sweaty sleeper but my sleeping bag was ALWAYS a "mummy" shape with hood cos I don't mind cold but draughts stiffen my muscles unbearably (and all my experienced camper friends have similar experiences). I found synthetic fibre fills sweaty but I could never afford down and they are at least easy to wash. If you're small then a "child", aka 3/4 length, sleeping bag would be lighter/smaller to carry.

Tent. If I was going to buy a tent then I'd either buy the smallest/lightest/flatest tent for carrying and repeatedly re-pitching OR a tent I could stand up in if I was only carrying it there and back and leaving it pitched (especially for several nights). Think about whether you'll want to cook in your tent (and consider a design with a porch).

Date: 2012-03-19 11:17 pm (UTC)
spiralsheep: Sheep wearing an eyepatch (spiralsheep Ram Raider mpfc)
From: [personal profile] spiralsheep
Tent, clarification. By "flattest" I meant most unlikely to catch the wind. By "stand up" I meant (probably) stooped.

Date: 2012-03-27 07:42 pm (UTC)
spiralsheep: Flowers (skywardprodigal Cog Flowers)
From: [personal profile] spiralsheep
I was wondering about that. I have no idea of the dimensions of a bouldering mat or whether there are options for partial inflation (e.g. if I wanted to inflate a normal inflatable mattress so it was taught enough to take my weight but in a smaller area then I could use some form of compression straps to restrict its final size or maybe even inflate it inside an extra-strong bin bag or something. I dunno). I'm sure there's a sensible option for combining the two because people must want to do it.

Date: 2012-03-20 03:20 am (UTC)
spiralsheep: Sheep wearing an eyepatch (spiralsheep Ram Raider mpfc)
From: [personal profile] spiralsheep
Oh, and you didn't ask but....

Shop: their retail park superstores aren't public transport friendly but I've found Decathlon tend to be cheap and their own brands reliable.

(Sorry for the comment spam.)

Date: 2012-03-20 01:26 pm (UTC)
commodorified: a capital m, in fancy type, on a coloured background (Default)
From: [personal profile] commodorified
You might wish to know that many YHA hostels offer tent spaces on the property, which gives you access to a kitchen, laundry, internet, and a full bathroom for the day at a very reasonable price.
Edited Date: 2012-03-20 01:26 pm (UTC)

Date: 2012-03-27 07:47 pm (UTC)
spiralsheep: Flowers (skywardprodigal Cog Flowers)
From: [personal profile] spiralsheep
+1

All the privacy of a tent with the facilities and comparative safety of a YHA hostel.

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